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In the US Civil War, what factors contributed to the Union having such a numerical advantage over the Confederacy?

There are many questions like this.

Look, maybe something is wrong with the question. What?

I mean, not real is far from descriptive.

What is unreal about a question. It is a question. I has a question mark.

If the issue is too trivial, politically incorrect, or bad grammar then just say so.

Also is asking easy question a bad thing or what?

So what if people can look that up in wikipedia. Wikipedia is not always correct and answers here are often better.

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    Jim, but you didn't even show that you've read at least the Wikipedia article to get to know something about the subject. Personally, I'm much more happy with providing the answers when I see that the asking person is seriously looking for it, and not just waiting for others. – Darek Wędrychowski Apr 8 '13 at 3:58
  • If you check wikipedia, you will know that it's not answered there either. – user4951 Apr 8 '13 at 4:15
  • It looks to me like there were in fact comments on the question attempting to explain deficiencies, including from at least one of the closers. Presumably if the others had significantly different reasons, they would have posted their own comments. – T.E.D. Apr 8 '13 at 12:16
  • @JimThio: It has now been reopened. – Tom Au Apr 10 '13 at 12:38
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As the moderator who provided the final vote to close it, I can only speak for myself. I felt that the question was too broad and would very likely have led to an open debate as to the different reasons. By the time I actually closed the question, it already had at least four downvotes and three votes to close. It appeared to me that the community in general had already made a decision that the question wasn't suitable, and I couldn't find enough justification to contradict them. If you would like to reword it or ask it again with something more specific, then it might have a better chance.

  • In which case the comment should it's too broad. – user4951 Apr 8 '13 at 4:14
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    I mean how the hell "it's too broad" means "not real question". You see how confusing it is. Also I do not think it's too broad. It specifically ask why too many sides are on why side. – user4951 Apr 8 '13 at 4:15
  • @JimThio Read the close notification again: "This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form." – yannis Apr 8 '13 at 13:24
  • From my voting experience I find that the notification given at the website doesn't mean that all voters chose it. If all of them chose different one, it could be even random, or the first chosen, depending on the algorythm. – Darek Wędrychowski Apr 8 '13 at 18:17
  • I believe I was focused on the same thing that Yannis noted: "overly broad". Unfortuantely, the options they give us to choose from are often "overly broad" themselves. – Steven Drennon Apr 8 '13 at 23:07
  • I would characterize the original question as "incomplete." That is, there weren't enough specifics for the question to be answered with any degree of "granularity." I added enough "specifics" to get the question reopened. – Tom Au Apr 10 '13 at 12:40
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There are two possible questions here. One of them is "trivial." The other is a very interesting one. The problem with your question is that you didn't spell out which of the two questions you meant.

The trivial question is, given the (actual) line up of 22 Union (not all northern) and 11 Confederate states, why did the Union win? The simple answer is that the 22 Union states had a 2 to 1 manpower advantage and a 10 to 1 advantage in industrial output. No surprise at the result.

The interesting question is, given the origins of the conflict between nine northeastern states and eleven southern states, why did the other 13 states side with the northeast? And would the war have gone the other way if they had all chosen to side with the south? THAT was the question that my link answered.

You had a "real question" there. Next time, please do a better job of spelling it out.

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    Personally I suspect he was asking the "trivial" one... – T.E.D. Apr 8 '13 at 13:54
  • I am not american. I do not know the detail as much as american. The fact is the north has more men. But why? – user4951 Apr 9 '13 at 2:48
  • @JimThio - Ah. Now that's a slightly more interesting question. – T.E.D. Apr 9 '13 at 13:09
  • I updated the question again. Thanks everyone. Yea the former isn't very clear. – user4951 Apr 11 '13 at 1:17
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I don't know that I would have voted to close the question, but I do agree that it is too broad. It isn't clear what you are specifically looking for with the question. Are you interested in why the population size was different? Are you interested in if there was a difference in conscription rates? Are you interested in desertion rates between the two? What time-frame are you interested in? The whole war? The end of the war? The beginning of the war? The fact that I can think of so many questions seems to indicate that the question isn't narrow enough.

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