15

No. If you don't like the question the user asked, moderate it (comment on it, downvote it, vote to close it, vote to delete it). However, a user's profile is their own and they can write whatever they want in it1. Furthermore, one off topic question is not valid grounds for suspension, however egregious the question might be. If it was, I doubt there would ...


10

Some topics are known to cause flamewars on the Internet. A history site needs to handle a number of classes of question with care: Politics (in the sense of answers having implications in current political struggles) Conspiracy theories Perceptions of minorities Religion (especially when touching on the existence of God and miracles) Popular philosophy ...


10

The Wikipedia article you cited includes a section titled Controversy, which does in fact appear (to me) to answer your question. Despite your assertion that "... I have taken great pain to explain why this article is inadequate ..." I do not see that explanation in your question (where it should be) or in the comments below the question (which are in ...


10

The best way may be to search inside our chatroom, The Time Machine. Our Historian bot automatically link new questions to the chat feed as they appear, and this is preserved even when the post itself got deleted by community, barring moderator intervention in exceptional cases. In fact, the bot link includes the author of the question, so you can find all ...


8

As you say the question was heavily edited; I can't say what state the question was in when I voted to close. The underlying question is interesting, but I think it is a bad fit for H:SE. My first thought when reading the question was "This is a question that is more likely to result in debate/discussion/long comment thread; this is not a question that ...


8

Note: In this answer closing refers to both 'on hold' and 'closed' questions. Close early, close often. Closing is an integral part of the Stack Exchange system designed to keep unsuitable questions from getting answers. Why? Because a poor question generally gets poor answers. If the question is closed, improved, and reopened, the asker then gets better ...


7

it's possible to ask a good objective question on this subject, by examining the historiography rather than inviting users to provide their personal opinions. Unfortunately I don't think we have seen that done so far. This is, I believe, a common problem with complex issues on this site. Many people seem to approach multifaceted controversies expecting ...


7

To the best of my knowledge, there has never been a notability requirement as such on History.SE. There is, however, a requirement that a question should be answerable using historical methods, and a longstanding consensus against genealogical questions. Together this tend to rule out questions on life events of obscure individuals who do not otherwise leave ...


7

Welcome @a_sid! I didn't vote to close, so I can't answer why people voted as they did. I can offer a few observations that might be useful. No preliminary research. Like most SE sites, we expect questions to contain evidence that the poster has made an effort to solve the problem; we're looking for preliminary research. This isn't a hard and fast rule (...


6

Try this command as a search query: user:27333 deleted:1 closed:0 is:question (Only admins/mods can retry this exact command, the usernumber limits this to the original poster) After you are convinced that your edits have improved the post to a reasonable quality, flag that post for 'mod attention' and ask for undeletion. That's the preferred way. As long ...


6

Thank you for asking. I am always glad when someone engages the community and asks how to participate better, and I'm doubly glad when someone asks how to improve a question. I believe that is a vital part of H:SE. I can only offer my personal opinion. First, make the title a question. That helps make it very clear what you are asking. Second, I think the ...


4

I think you have the beginning of a potentially valid question, but as it stands right now the question does not contain enough information for a user to know with a good degree of certainty what you are looking for. You should try to add what you may already suspect is the answer. So, something like "Did concerns about Soviet spies at the Department of ...


4

I wrote a long essay and just deleted it, because I think I'm not coming to a conclusion; the core things that made me uncomfortable with the question are: I'm not sure what "condemn" means, I'm not sure what "officially" means, and I'm not sure what the precendent is that would cause us to condemn one action of the US government separate from all the ...


4

See Mark Wallace's answer to the Why did I get a downvote meta question. This particular question is a classic example of a "When did you stop beating your wife" question. There's an implicit assumption in the question that it was something worthy of condemning. Merely trying to answer it would validate that assumption. In my experience, questions of that ...


4

In most cases where I vote to close a question I write a comment first, and only vote to close if that comments doesn't get a response, or if the problem with the question is not solved. I only vote to close immediately if I think the question is irreparably problematic. Although it's perfectly possibly that you get your post closed by uninformed members, ...


4

You no longer have the ability to edit the question (read no one, barring mods, has the ability to edit your question for the time being) because it has been locked by the mods. Yes, locking a post does lock all features of the post including commenting, editing, voting, and answering. The reason given was off-topic comments, which seems entirely valid given ...


4

I personally think it's a reasonable question, if properly worded. Arguably, WWII was an (in)direct result of the conditions imposed on Germany as the "aggressor" in '14 -' 18, so the consequences were far-reaching. I'm not suggesting there is a "one size fits all" answer, just that it is a valid question. I think @T.E.D's suggestion an excellent solution.


4

All these questions are difficult and controversial. Perhaps the new ones are asked exactly because the first, original one, is closed. So it makes no sense now to label the new questions as "duplicate". One way out of it it to keep one of these questions open, and to close the rest (existing and future ones) as duplicates. But of course the community may ...


4

Asking about Jesus is mostly off-topic, because we don't know anything about him as a historical person. I personally do not doubt he existed, but the texts written about him are all written with religious goals, not with the goal to teach us about the historical person. As such, the statement that he offered two pigeons instead of a lamb might have been ...


3

The "heavy edits" appear to be just deletion of a bunch of Biblical background material that really contributed nothing to the question. Let's do a little diversion to remove religon from this issue. If the same question were to be asked about a mythological figure like Jason, would it also be off topic? Some would probably say "yes", as mythology is ...


3

At the moment questions are put "on hold", so they are not closed immediately. You may consider this "on-hold" period as this delay.


3

As one of the people who voted to close, I basically agree with Semaphore's answer: for something to qualify as history there either has to be some degree of historical significance (i.e. notability) or it can be mundane but illustrative of common conditions in some historical era. For me the question didn't really meet the criteria: did the groupie of a ...


2

wip taken from https://skeptics.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/1345/faq-my-question-was-put-on-hold-or-has-been-closed-what-does-it-mean please review & can someone with a HiDPI display make updated screenshots for the pictures below? A few descriptions below are from ages ago and need precise updates as well Rationale: why do we close questions?...


2

The bible is not an adequate primary source for naïve historical exegeses online. Theology an admirable disciplinary humanity belongs elsewhere.


2

Let me make myself really clear. I am really an amateur in history, and relatively a newcomer here. I am sorry if this extended comment is unacceptable. But as the other answer mentions, if all why questions are primarily opinion-based, and thus off-topic, then what remains on-topic? Just the who, what, when and where questions, which in my opinion, are far ...


2

I happen to believe that all three of these questions are primarily opinion based. On the third question, I accepted the "unclear" option because that was what the others had already selected. One of the things I always look for in a question is 1) can it be answered with a clear and concise response, or 2) is it more likely to solicit discussion or ...


2

The question raised as evidence (which is revisiting the closure, not the principle of the closure) is unanswerable by historiographical techniques. Any answer provided would lack any validity as a historical answer, it would amount to speculation and misrepresentation. It is my position that until informed otherwise by the community, as appears to be ...


1

The earliest school I can find matching your definition is the University of Oxford, founded in 1096, at which time the teaching of Latin was definitely on the curriculum. By the mid-Renaissance, say 1500 or so, Ancient Greek would have also been on the curriculum. Your time frame is just over 900 years, for more than half of which it is trivially ...


1

You asked two or three questions: 1) Do most universities require Ancient Greek or Latin? 2) From when to when? 3) And the implicit question was "where." You defined "where" in your revision. That was good start. Now YOU should define "when to when." That narrows the question further. Perhaps you can narrow the question even more by specifying what types of ...


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