8

Excellent question. I think the answer isn't upvotes or downvotes, but a collective agreement about what we want. I think you've offered an excellent summary of what I'm looking for, "this site was fun and educational--a good place to learn different historical theories." - a fun place to learn. Without specific examples, I'm not sure what you mean by ...


6

I don't think downvoting answers that you find are incorrect or unhelpful even though they makes argument from sources is the problem. The problem is long discussions in the comments based on peoples prejudice and religion. It was suggested by someone (though I forgot who) that we make tighter rules for questions about history of religion, which seems quite ...


6

By now I am resigned to the expectation that it will never happen. The question-and-answer engine that powers SE should be good enough to attract communities of experts around any topic. Good enough so that the ease of use in getting answers (experts have questions, too!) should outweigh, as a plus, the minus of "donating free labor". To make this happen, SE ...


5

Strange jeep-hold cable used during Operation Horev One of our better questions. The question contains the information necessary to start research. Comprable results from google are unsatisfactory. Are the Samaritans descendants of Israel's lost tribes, and so rightfully considered Israelites? I don't like this question. There is a citation, but the citation ...


5

Here's what I got: Population disparities between New York City and Boston Needs Improvement. I like this question a lot. However, a request for a slightly better rewording in the comments went unanswered. Also, I pretty much had to enter the entire title before Google found it (top hit when it did though). But the worst problem is that none of the answers ...


4

I would like to point out that voting and comments are complimentary. There is no reason why an answer shouldn't be commented on bit (or even a lot) before settling into a pile of up and down votes. Especially as votes can't be changed easily due to game-theory adjustments made in the early days of the stackoverflow stack exchange. I think we comment ...


3

My highly opinionated evaluation. Prominent examples of scientific racism in ancient Greece The first page of google results overlap with the material presented in the question; consequently I judge that the answers are superior to anything that google provides. I have only a superficial acquaintance with the historiography of racism, but I’m not aware of ...


3

Around the time of the last site eval I posted this question: Concerns about the future utility of this site In my opinion, the site has improved 1000% since then. Great job, History.SE!


3

I really appreciate T.E.D.'s analysis; I don't have much to add to it this time around. Instead, I want to highlight a couple of posts based on some queries I built. Let's start with the bad news. Many people find History.SE and disagree with the accepted answer to Why didn't Japanese infantrymen and samurai use shields? In the last 180 days 50 anonymous ...


3

Why did Central and South American nations participate in WWII? Excellent. The question itself was a bit squishy, but the answer was absolutely wonderful. I wasn't even sure how to begin Googling for it. How could a chariot work against a phalanx? Excellent. The question was truly puzzling, as presented. The accepted answer (with a bit of help from ...


3

We can promote the site among communities that have "professional historians," whatever that means. I think, unlike say Stackoverflow where there are tons of professionals from private industry, the only people that would be considered "professional historians" in a similar sense are probably university professors that study and teach history. I'm sure there ...


2

The day that there is wide spread private or public hiring of historians is the day you might get to float this community on the excess volunteer labour of people skiving off work. At the moment the size of the professional historian community, and the nature of the one serious job they can get, means that they're not going to preference "community outreach"...


2

We on the Community Manager Team use the opportunity of site self-evaluations to see how things are going. Looking over this quarter's evaluation, I'd say that things are going rather well on History.SE. I appreciate Mark C. Wallace's analysis of the sample questions and all the input on the July sample. They were very helpful in my evaluation. Quality, ...


1

Just went through and did mine (how did I miss this post for half a month?) I ended up giving about 50/50 Excellent and Satisfactory. Most of the satisfactories were docked for some combination of low Google rank and/or lack of good alternate answers. That's a huge improvement over my previous evals. My last one had 3 "Needs Improvement"s on it, and that ...


1

Final Results What is the significance of roof charms outside of the Forbidden City? Net Score: 0 (Excellent: 4, Satisfactory: 3, Needs Improvement: 4) Prominent examples of scientific racism in ancient Greece Net Score: 0 (Excellent: 3, Satisfactory: 5, Needs Improvement: 3) What factors led to the 30% devaluation of pound sterling in 1949? Net Score: ...


1

Final Results Why was the water in roman fountains cold? Net Score: 6 (Excellent: 7, Satisfactory: 5, Needs Improvement: 1) Are the Samaritans descendants of Israel's lost tribes, and so rightfully considered Israelites? Net Score: 6 (Excellent: 7, Satisfactory: 5, Needs Improvement: 1) How was Abd al-Rahman I recognized when he arrived in Islamic ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible